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Richmond Hill gets grant for historical markers

Signs to help promote heritage tourism

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POSTED: April 5, 2012 12:23 p.m.


Richmond Hill will install new historical markers in the next few months, thanks to a grant from the Coastal Resources Division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.
The city announced Monday it received approximately $13,000 to pay for seven large markers and 10 smaller plaques for historic homes.
Volunteers will install the markers in late April or early May, according to a press release.
Written by historian Buddy Sullivan, the markers will describe the historic event that took place at each site. The house plaques will be part of a driving tour.
Richmond Hill received the grant to promote ecological and heritage tourism, and for the protection of ecological and heritage resources.
The city hopes to promote heritage tourism by installing the historical markers and plaques in the Richmond Hill area, according to the release.
The markers will cover early rice cultivation on the Ogeechee River, rice grower Richard James Arnold, a Guale village at Seven-Mile Bend, the "Bottom" village, Canaan Church, the Clay family of Bryan Neck and George W. McAlllister. The Clays, along with McAllister and Arnold, were among the country's leading producers of rice before the Civil War.
Bryan County was one of the top rice producers in the 1830s and 1840s, shipping about 3 million pounds of rice a year from local planatations, according to the New Georgia Encyclopedia.
The city's website will eventually be updated with the historical marker information in the coming months, the press release said.
The city received the grant to promote ecological and heritage tourism, and for the protection of ecological and heritage resources, the press release said. It noted eco-heritage tourism provides unique opportunities for communities to enhance their local economy in a manner that promotes, protects, and builds attitudes of stewardship for coastal natural and cultural resources.

 

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